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Int Immunol. 2018 Jun 26;30(7):319-331. doi: 10.1093/intimm/dxy035.

Effects of long-term intake of a yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 and Streptococcus thermophilus 1131 on mice.

Author information

1
Division of Systems Immunology, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Mucosal Immunology, School of Medicine, Chiba University, Inohana, Chuou-ku, Chiba, Japan.
3
Division of Innate Immune Regulation, International Research and Development Center for Mucosal Vaccines, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Food Science Research Laboratories, R&D Division, Meiji Co., Ltd, Naruda, Odawara, Kanagawa, Japan.
5
Division of Rheumatology, Center for Antibody and Vaccine Therapy, IMSUT Hospital, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Division of Health Medical Data Science, Health Intelligence Center, The Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
7
Institut Pasteur, Microenvironment and Immunity Unit, Paris, France.
8
INSERM, Paris, France.

Abstract

The gut is an extremely complicated ecosystem where micro-organisms, nutrients and host cells interact vigorously. Although the function of the intestine and its barrier system weakens with age, some probiotics can potentially prevent age-related intestinal dysfunction. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 and Streptococcus thermophilus 1131, which are the constituents of LB81 yogurt, are representative probiotics. However, it is unclear whether their long-term intake has a beneficial influence on systemic function. Here, we examined the gut microbiome, fecal metabolites and gene expression profiles of various organs in mice. Although age-related alterations were apparent in them, long-term LB81 yogurt intake led to an increased Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio and elevated abundance of the bacterial family S24-7 (Bacteroidetes), which is known to be associated with butyrate and propanoate production. According to our fecal metabolite analysis to detect enrichment, long-term LB81 yogurt intake altered the intestinal metabolic pathways associated with propanoate and butanoate in the mice. Gene ontology analysis also revealed that long-term LB81 yogurt intake influenced many physiological functions related to the defense response. The profiles of various genes associated with antimicrobial peptides-, tight junctions-, adherens junctions- and mucus-associated intestinal barrier functions were also drastically altered in the LB81 yogurt-fed mice. Thus, long-term intake of LB81 yogurt has the potential to maintain systemic homeostasis, such as the gut barrier function, by controlling the intestinal microbiome and its metabolites.

PMID:
29767727
DOI:
10.1093/intimm/dxy035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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