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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 May 16. doi: 10.1038/s41430-018-0175-1. [Epub ahead of print]

Polyunsaturated fatty acid status at birth, childhood growth, and cardiometabolic risk: a pooled analysis of the MEFAB and RHEA cohorts.

Author information

1
Section of Complex Genetics and Epidemiology, Departments of Genetics and Cell Biology, School for Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. n.stratakis@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
2
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. n.stratakis@maastrichtuniversity.nl.
3
Section of Complex Genetics and Epidemiology, Departments of Genetics and Cell Biology, School for Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
5
Welten Institute-Research Centre for Learning, Teaching and Technology, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.
6
Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (ECPL), Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
7
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School for Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism (NUTRIM), Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
8
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.
9
IMIM Hospital del Mar Medicine Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain.
10
Spanish Consortium for Research in epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
11
The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus.
12
School CAPHRI: Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
13
Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) status during pregnancy has been suggested to influence offspring obesity and cardiometabolic health. We assessed whether prenatal PUFA exposure is associated with rapid infant growth, childhood BMI, and cardiometabolic profile.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

In the Dutch MEFAB (n = 266) and Greek RHEA (n = 263) cohorts, we measured n-3 and n-6 PUFA concentrations in cord blood phospholipids, which reflect fetal exposure in late pregnancy. We defined rapid infant growth from birth to 6 months of age as an increase in weight z-score >0.67. We analyzed body mass index (BMI) as continuous and in categories of overweight/obesity at 4 and 6 years. We computed a cardiometabolic risk score at 6-7 years as the sum of waist circumference, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure z-scores. Associations of PUFAs with child health outcomes were assessed using generalized linear models for binary outcomes and linear regression models for continuous ones after adjusting for important covariates, and for the pooled estimates, a cohort indicator.

RESULTS:

In pooled analyses, we found no association of PUFA levels with rapid infant growth, childhood BMI (β per SD increase in the total n-3:n-6 PUFA ratio = -0.04 SD; 99% CI: -0.15, 0.06; P = 0.65 at 4 years, and -0.05 SD; 99% CI: -0.18, 0.08; P = 0.78 at 6 years), and overweight/obesity. We also found no associations for clustered cardiometabolic risk and its individual components. The results were similar across cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that PUFA concentrations at birth are not associated with later obesity development and cardiometabolic risk in childhood.

PMID:
29765163
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-018-0175-1

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