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Nat Commun. 2018 May 15;9(1):1910. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04295-5.

Changes in genome organization of parasite-specific gene families during the Plasmodium transmission stages.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA.
2
Department of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology, University of California Riverside, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA.
3
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.
4
Department of Statistics, University of California, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
5
Berkeley Institute for Data Science, 190 Doe Library, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
6
MINES ParisTech, PSL Research University, CBIO-Centre for Computational Biology, 60 boulevard Saint-Michel, 75006, Paris, France.
7
Institut Curie, 75248, Paris, France.
8
U900, INSERM, Paris, 75248, France.
9
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615N. Wolfe Street, E5132, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.
10
Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine Research building, University of Oxford, Old Road campus, Roosevelt Drive, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7FZ, UK.
11
Shoklo Malaria Research Unit, Mahidol-Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Mae Sot, Tak, 63110, Thailand.
12
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Columbia University Medical Center, 701W. 168 St., HHSC 1208, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
13
School of Life Sciences, Queens Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK.
14
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
15
La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology, 9420 Athena Cir, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
16
Département de mathématiques et applications, École normale supérieure, CNRS, PSL Research University, Paris, 75005, France.
17
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. william-noble@uw.edu.
18
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. william-noble@uw.edu.
19
Department of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology, University of California Riverside, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA. karine.leroch@ucr.edu.

Abstract

The development of malaria parasites throughout their various life cycle stages is coordinated by changes in gene expression. We previously showed that the three-dimensional organization of the Plasmodium falciparum genome is strongly associated with gene expression during its replication cycle inside red blood cells. Here, we analyze genome organization in the P. falciparum and P. vivax transmission stages. Major changes occur in the localization and interactions of genes involved in pathogenesis and immune evasion, host cell invasion, sexual differentiation, and master regulation of gene expression. Furthermore, we observe reorganization of subtelomeric heterochromatin around genes involved in host cell remodeling. Depletion of heterochromatin protein 1 (PfHP1) resulted in loss of interactions between virulence genes, confirming that PfHP1 is essential for maintenance of the repressive center. Our results suggest that the three-dimensional genome structure of human malaria parasites is strongly connected with transcriptional activity of specific gene families throughout the life cycle.

PMID:
29765020
PMCID:
PMC5954139
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-04295-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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