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Psychiatry Res. 2018 Jul;265:265-270. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.04.052. Epub 2018 May 6.

Race/ethnicity, psychological resilience, and social support among OEF/OIF combat veterans.

Author information

1
Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH) San Diego, CA USA; VA San Diego Healthcare System, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA USA.
2
Baruch College & The Graduate Center, City University of New York, NY USA.
3
Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH) San Diego, CA USA; VA San Diego Healthcare System, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA USA. Electronic address: nafari@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between race/ethnicity and psychological resilience, and the moderating role of social support in this relationship among non-Hispanic White (n = 605), Hispanic (n = 107), African American (n = 141), and Asian American (n = 97) Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) combat veterans. Veterans were primarily male (88%) with a mean age of 31.4 years (SD = 8.35). An analysis of covariance showed that Asian American veterans reported significantly lower psychological resilience than non-Hispanic White veterans. The interaction of race/ethnicity and social support with psychological resilience was examined via linear regression. We found that the relationship between psychological resilience and social support significantly differed by race/ethnicity such that social support was positively associated with psychological resilience among non-Hispanic White veterans, but not among other racial/ethnic groups. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that show Asian American veterans report lower psychological resilience than non-Hispanic White veterans. Cultural differences in how and why individuals use social support may underlie racial/ethnic differences in the relationship between social support and psychological resilience. Future qualitative and quantitative research is encouraged to better understand how social support relates to psychological resilience among minority OEF/OIF combat veterans.

KEYWORDS:

Combat; Ethnicity; Psychological resilience; Race; Social support; Veterans

PMID:
29763847
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2018.04.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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