Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Resuscitation. 2018 Aug;129:141-145. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2018.05.014. Epub 2018 May 12.

Cerebral tissue oximetry levels during prehospital management of cardiac arrest - A prospective observational study.

Author information

1
Community health centre Maribor - Center for Emergency medicine, Cesta Proletarskih brigad 21, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia AND University of Maribor Medical Faculty, Taborska cesta 8, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia. Electronic address: gregorprosen@gmail.com.
2
Community health centre Maribor - Center for Emergency medicine, Cesta Proletarskih brigad 21, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia AND University of Maribor Medical Faculty, Taborska cesta 8, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola NY, USA; St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
University of Maribor Medical Faculty, Taborska cesta 8, Slovenia and University Medical Centre Maribor, Ljubljanska 5, 2000, Maribor, Slovenia.
5
University of Maribor Medical Faculty, Taborska cesta 8, 2000, Maribor, Slovenia.
6
Community health centre Maribor - Center for Emergency medicine, Cesta Proletarskih brigad 21, 2000 Maribor, Slovenia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables continuous monitoring of regional oximetry (rSO2). The aim of this study was to describe dynamics of regional cerebral oximetry levels during out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation, specifically around the time of restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).

METHODS:

This prospective observational study was performed in the prehospital setting during cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of OHCA patients. In the three-year study period, two-hundred eighty OHCA's were responded to; rSO2 was continuously measured throughout CPR and after attaining ROSC.

RESULTS:

Final data analysis included 53 patients. Continuous rSO2dynamics were described and data was compared amongst ROSC (22 cases) and no-ROSC (31 cases) groups. Initial rSO2levels were below 15% (not detectable) in both groups. With ongoing CPR, rSO2levels were higher in the ROSC group (median 22% vs. 14% in no-ROSC group, p = 0.030). Until ROSC, rSO2levels were higher throughout CPR before ROSC (mean maximal value 47% at ROSC vs. 31% no-ROSC, p < 0.01). Furthermore, we found a pattern of significant, rapid and sustained rise in rSO2levels minutes prior to ROSC and normalization thereafter.

CONCLUSIONS:

Initial rSO2levels during OHCA are generally undetectable by the time EMS teams initiate CPR. With CPR, rSO2levels rise and are higher during CPR in patients who later achieve ROSC. Patients who achieve ROSC exhibit significant, rapid, and sustained rise in rSO2minutes prior to attaining ROSC, and normalization of rSO2 levels thereafter. Persistently low levels of rSO2 during CPR likely portend poor neurologic outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral oximetry; Dynamics; EMS; NIRS; OHCA; Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; Prehospital emergency medicine, cardiac arrest, survival; ROSC; rSO(2)

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center