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Exp Neurol. 2018 Aug;306:149-157. doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2018.05.011. Epub 2018 May 17.

A ketogenic diet reduces metabolic syndrome-induced allodynia and promotes peripheral nerve growth in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, United States.
2
Department of Integrative and Molecular Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, United States.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, United States.
4
Kansas Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, United States.
5
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, United States. Electronic address: dwright@kumc.edu.

Abstract

Current experiments investigated whether a ketogenic diet impacts neuropathy associated with obesity and prediabetes. Mice challenged with a ketogenic diet were compared to mice fed a high-fat diet or a high-fat diet plus exercise. Additionally, an intervention switching to a ketogenic diet following 8 weeks of high-fat diet was performed to compare how a control diet, exercise, or a ketogenic diet affects metabolic syndrome-induced neural complications. When challenged with a ketogenic diet, mice had reduced bodyweight and fat mass compared to high-fat-fed mice, and were similar to exercised, high-fat-fed mice. High-fat-fed, exercised and ketogenic-fed mice had mildly elevated blood glucose; conversely, ketogenic diet-fed mice were unique in having reduced serum insulin levels. Ketogenic diet-fed mice never developed mechanical allodynia contrary to mice fed a high-fat diet. Ketogenic diet fed mice also had increased epidermal axon density compared all other groups. When a ketogenic diet was used as an intervention, a ketogenic diet was unable to reverse high-fat fed-induced metabolic changes but was able to significantly reverse a high-fat diet-induced mechanical allodynia. As an intervention, a ketogenic diet also increased epidermal axon density. In vitro studies revealed increased neurite outgrowth in sensory neurons from mice fed a ketogenic diet and in neurons from normal diet-fed mice given ketone bodies in the culture medium. These results suggest a ketogenic diet can prevent certain complications of prediabetes and provides significant benefits to peripheral axons and sensory dysfunction.

KEYWORDS:

DRG; Diabetes; Exercise; High-fat; Ketogenic; Ketones; Mice; Pain

PMID:
29763602
PMCID:
PMC5994385
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.expneurol.2018.05.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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