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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2018 Aug;118(8):1539-1546. doi: 10.1007/s00421-018-3883-2. Epub 2018 May 14.

Comparison of fatigue responses and rapid force characteristics between explosive- and traditional-resistance-trained males.

Author information

1
Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA.
2
Applied Physiology and Sports Medicine Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 66506, USA.
3
Department of Wellness, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA.
4
Applied Neuromuscular Physiology Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA. jason.defreitas@okstate.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare maximal and rapid force characteristics, as well as fatigability, between traditional (TRT) and explosive (ERT) resistance-trained men.

METHODS:

Fourteen TRT (mean age = 25 years) and twelve ERT (mean age = 22 years) men performed rapid maximal contractions followed by an isokinetic fatigue protocol consisting of 50 maximal knee extension (KE) and flexions (KF) at a moderate speed (180° s-¹). Baseline measures included: isokinetic peak torque (PT), isometric rate of torque development (RTD0-50), peak acceleration (ACCmax), and peak velocity (Vmax). Changes in torque with fatigue were used to calculate a fatigue index (FI%).

RESULTS:

The ERT group (M ± SD; 1199.05 ± 404.12) displayed a significantly higher isometric RTD0-50 (p = 0.049) during KE than the TRT group (931.73 ± 244.75). No other significant differences in the dependent variables (PT, FI%, ACCmax, Vmax; all p ≥ 0.05) were observed between groups (TRT vs. ERT) for either of the muscle groups (KE and KF).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of the present study indicated that only knee extension RTD was able to discriminate between the two groups. These findings suggest that rapid force production may be more sensitive at distinguishing training-specific muscular adaptations than peak acceleration or velocity.

KEYWORDS:

Acceleration; Fatigue; Rate of force development; Resistance training; Velocity

PMID:
29761311
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-018-3883-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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