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Circulation. 2018 May 15;137(20):2166-2178. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.029652.

Socioeconomic Status and Cardiovascular Outcomes: Challenges and Interventions.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine (W.M.S., J.C.L., T.V.).
2
Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (H.M.K., J.S., P.S., A.A.Q., L.S.S.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.
3
Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (H.A.T.).
4
University of Arizona-Phoenix College of Medicine (M.G.).
5
Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (J.G.H.).
6
Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY (J.H.M.).
7
Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (K.C.F.).
8
Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (G.A.M.).
9
Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (H.M.K., J.S., P.S., A.A.Q., L.S.S.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA lsperli@emory.edu.

Abstract

Socioeconomic status (SES) has a measurable and significant effect on cardiovascular health. Biological, behavioral, and psychosocial risk factors prevalent in disadvantaged individuals accentuate the link between SES and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Four measures have been consistently associated with CVD in high-income countries: income level, educational attainment, employment status, and neighborhood socioeconomic factors. In addition, disparities based on sex have been shown in several studies. Interventions targeting patients with low SES have predominantly focused on modification of traditional CVD risk factors. Promising approaches are emerging that can be implemented on an individual, community, or population basis to reduce disparities in outcomes. Structured physical activity has demonstrated effectiveness in low-SES populations, and geomapping may be used to identify targets for large-scale programs. Task shifting, the redistribution of healthcare management from physician to nonphysician providers in an effort to improve access to health care, may have a role in select areas. Integration of SES into the traditional CVD risk prediction models may allow improved management of individuals with high risk, but cultural and regional differences in SES make generalized implementation challenging. Future research is required to better understand the underlying mechanisms of CVD risk that affect individuals of low SES and to determine effective interventions for patients with high risk. We review the current state of knowledge on the impact of SES on the incidence, treatment, and outcomes of CVD in high-income societies and suggest future research directions aimed at the elimination of these adverse factors, and the integration of measures of SES into the customization of cardiovascular treatment.

KEYWORDS:

cardiovascular diseases; epidemiology; risk factors; social class; social determinants of health

PMID:
29760227
PMCID:
PMC5958918
[Available on 2019-05-15]
DOI:
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.029652

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