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JMIR Ment Health. 2018 May 14;5(2):e38. doi: 10.2196/mental.9802.

Temporal Associations Between Social Activity and Mood, Fatigue, and Pain in Older Adults With HIV: An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study.

Author information

1
San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, CA, United States.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.
3
VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, United States.
4
The Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Social isolation is associated with an increased risk for mental and physical health problems, especially among older persons living with HIV (PLWH). Thus, there is a need to better understand real-time temporal associations between social activity and mood- and health-related factors in this population to inform possible future interventions.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aims to examine real-time relationships between social activity and mood, fatigue, and pain in a sample of older PLWH.

METHODS:

A total of 20 older PLWH, recruited from the University of California, San Diego HIV Neurobehavioral Research Program in 2016, completed smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) surveys 5 times per day for 1 week. Participants reported their current social activity (alone vs not alone and number of social interactions) and levels of mood (sadness, happiness, and stress), fatigue, and pain. Mixed-effects regression models were used to analyze concurrent and lagged associations among social activity, mood, fatigue, and pain.

RESULTS:

Participants (mean age 58.8, SD 4.3 years) reported being alone 63% of the time, on average, (SD 31.5%) during waking hours. Being alone was related to lower concurrent happiness (beta=-.300; 95% CI -.525 to -.079; P=.008). In lagged analyses, social activity predicted higher levels of fatigue later in the day (beta=-1.089; 95% CI -1.780 to -0.396; P=.002), and higher pain levels predicted being alone in the morning with a reduced likelihood of being alone as the day progressed (odds ratio 0.945, 95% CI 0.901-0.992; P=.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

The use of EMA elucidated a high rate of time spent alone among older PLWH. Promoting social activity despite the presence of pain or fatigue may improve happiness and psychological well-being in this population.

KEYWORDS:

AIDS; ecological momentary assessment; happiness; quality of life; social isolation

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