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J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;63(4):1337-1346. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180176.

Gut Microbiota is Altered in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.
2
Department of Geriatrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
3
Department of Neurology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.
4
Department of Neurology, Chongqing General Hospital, Chongqing, China.
5
Department of Microbiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China.
6
Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

Abstract

Previous studies suggest that gut microbiota is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and depression. However, whether the composition and diversity of gut microbiota is altered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we collected fecal samples from 43 AD patients and 43 age- and gender-matched cognitively normal controls. 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing technique was used to analyze the microbiota composition in feces. The composition of gut microbiota was different between the two groups. Several bacteria taxa in AD patients were different from those in controls at taxonomic levels, such as Bacteroides, Actinobacteria, Ruminococcus, Lachnospiraceae, and Selenomonadales. Our findings suggest that gut microbiota is altered in AD patients and may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD.

KEYWORDS:

16S ribosomal RNA sequencing; Alzheimer’s disease; amyloid-β peptide; gut microbiota

PMID:
29758946
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-180176
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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