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Prev Med. 2018 Aug;113:57-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.05.010. Epub 2018 May 16.

The association between serum vitamin d level and cognitive function in older adults: Cooper Center Longitudinal Study.

Author information

1
The Cooper Institute, 12330 Preston Rd., Dallas, TX 75230, United States. Electronic address: apavlovic@cooperinst.org.
2
The Cooper Institute, 12330 Preston Rd., Dallas, TX 75230, United States.
3
The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75390, United States.

Abstract

Low blood level of vitamin D and low physical activity have been linked to the development of cognitive impairment in older adults. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between serum vitamin D and cognition as measured via the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in a healthy, older population. The study sample consisted of 4358 patients from the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, TX. All participants underwent a maximal graded exercise test to determine cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). Cognitive impairment was defined as a MoCA score <25. Low vitamin D status was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D <30 ng/mL. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was employed to evaluate the association between vitamin D blood level and MoCA score. A low MoCA score was directly associated with higher age (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.53, 1.99), and inversely associated with female sex (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.77), and years of education (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.84, 0.91). When controlling for significant predictors (age, sex, and education), the low vitamin D group had a significantly greater likelihood of having a low MoCA score (OR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.51). The vitamin D effect remained significant when CRF was added to the model (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.48). In conclusion, low vitamin D was shown to be associated with cognitive impairment. Therefore, preventive measures such as vitamin D supplementation may play a protective role in memory loss and/or age-associated cognitive decline.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiorespiratory fitness; Cognition; Vitamin D

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