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J Pharmacol Toxicol Methods. 2018 Sep - Oct;93:29-34. doi: 10.1016/j.vascn.2018.05.003. Epub 2018 May 9.

The use of human tissue in safety assessment.

Author information

1
The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sam.jackson@nc3rs.org.uk.
2
The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: helen.prior@nc3rs.org.uk.
3
The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), Gibbs Building, 215 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE, United Kingdom. Electronic address: anthony.holmes@nc3rs.org.uk.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The safety-related failure of drugs during clinical phases of development is a significant contributor to drug attrition, wasting resources and preventing treatments from reaching patients. A lack of concordance between results from animal models and adverse events in the clinic has been identified as one potential cause of attrition. In vitro models using human tissue or cells have the potential to replace some animal models and improve predictivity to humans.

METHODS:

To gauge the current use of human tissue models in safety pharmacology and the barriers to greater uptake, an electronic survey of the international safety assessment community was carried out and a Safety Pharmacology Society European Regional Meeting was organised entitled 'The Use of Human Tissue in Safety Assessment'.

RESULTS:

A greater range of human tissue models is in use in safety assessment now than four years ago, although data is still not routinely included in regulatory submissions. The barriers to increased uptake of the models have not changed over that time, with inadequate supply and characterisation of tissue being the most cited blocks.

DISCUSSION:

Supporting biobanking, the development of new human tissue modelling technology, and raising awareness in the scientific and regulatory communities are key ways in which the barriers to greater uptake of human tissue models can be overcome. The development of infrastructure and legislation in the UK to support the use of post-mortem or surgical discard tissue will allow scientists to locally source tissue for research.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Biobanking; Human tissue; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Methods; Microphysiological systems; Predictivity

PMID:
29753134
DOI:
10.1016/j.vascn.2018.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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