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Molecules. 2018 May 11;23(5). pii: E1157. doi: 10.3390/molecules23051157.

A Comprehensive Genome Survey Provides Novel Insights into Bile Salt Hydrolase (BSH) in Lactobacillaceae.

Liang L1,2, Yi Y3,4, Lv Y5,6, Qian J7,8, Lei X9,10, Zhang G11,12,13.

Author information

1
BGI Education Center, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518083, China. lianglifeng@genomics.cn.
2
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Genomics, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. lianglifeng@genomics.cn.
3
BGI Education Center, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518083, China. yiyunhai@genomics.cn.
4
Shenzhen Key Lab of Marine Genomics, Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Molecular Breeding in Marine Economic Animals, BGI Academy of Marine Sciences, BGI Marine, BGI, Shenzhen 518083, China. yiyunhai@genomics.cn.
5
BGI Education Center, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518083, China. lvyunyun@genomics.cn.
6
Shenzhen Key Lab of Marine Genomics, Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Molecular Breeding in Marine Economic Animals, BGI Academy of Marine Sciences, BGI Marine, BGI, Shenzhen 518083, China. lvyunyun@genomics.cn.
7
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Genomics, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. qianjunwei@genomics.cn.
8
Key Lab of Genomics, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. qianjunwei@genomics.cn.
9
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Genomics, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. leixuejing@genomics.cn.
10
Key Lab of Genomics, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. leixuejing@genomics.cn.
11
BGI Education Center, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518083, China. zhanggengyun@genomics.cn.
12
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Genomics, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. zhanggengyun@genomics.cn.
13
Key Lab of Genomics, Chinese Ministry of Agriculture, BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. zhanggengyun@genomics.cn.

Abstract

Bile salt hydrolase (BSH) is a well-known enzyme that has been commonly characterized in probiotic bacteria, as it has cholesterol-lowering effects. However, its molecular investigations are scarce. Here, we build a local database of BSH sequences from Lactobacillaceae (BSH⁻SDL), and phylogenetic analysis and homology searches were employed to elucidate their comparability and distinctiveness among species. Evolutionary study demonstrates that BSH sequences in BSH⁻SDL are divided into five groups, named BSH A, B, C, D and E here, which can be the genetic basis for BSH classification and nomenclature. Sequence analysis suggests the differences between BSH-active and BSH-inactive proteins clearly, especially on site 82. In addition, a total of 551 BSHs from 107 species are identified from 451 genomes of 158 Lactobacillaceae species. Interestingly, those bacteria carrying various copies of BSH A or B can be predicted to be potential cholesterol-lowering probiotics, based on the results of phylogenetic analysis and the subtypes that those previously reported BSH-active probiotics possess. In summary, this study elaborates the molecular basis of BSH in Lactobacillaceae systematically, and provides a novel methodology as well as a consistent standard for the identification of the BSH subtype. We believe that high-throughput screening can be efficiently applied to the selection of promising candidate BSH-active probiotics, which will advance the development of healthcare products in cholesterol metabolism.

KEYWORDS:

BSH classification; Lactobacillaceae; bile salt hydrolase (BSH); cholesterol-lowering probiotics; genome survey

PMID:
29751655
PMCID:
PMC6100381
DOI:
10.3390/molecules23051157
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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