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Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr;235:948-955. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2018.01.008. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Arsenic exposure, diabetes-related genes and diabetes prevalence in a general population from Spain.

Author information

1
Area of Cardiometabolic and Renal Risk, Biomedical Research Institute Hospital Clinic of Valencia (INCLIVA), Valencia, Spain; Department of Statistics and Operational Research, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA.
2
Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
3
Genomic and Genetic Diagnosis Unit, Biomedical Research Institute Hospital Clinic of Valencia (INCLIVA), Valencia, Spain.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Rio Hortega, Valladolid, Spain.
5
Department of Statistics and Operational Research, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
6
Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
7
Department of Chemistry, University of Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
8
Unidad de Investigación en Prevención Cardiovascular, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Aragón, CIBER Cardiovascular (CIBERCV), Zaragoza, Spain.
9
Area of Cardiometabolic and Renal Risk, Biomedical Research Institute Hospital Clinic of Valencia (INCLIVA), Valencia, Spain; CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, Minister of Health, Madrid, Spain; Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Clínico de Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
10
Genomic and Genetic Diagnosis Unit, Biomedical Research Institute Hospital Clinic of Valencia (INCLIVA), Valencia, Spain; CIBER of Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Diseases (CIBERDEM), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: felipe.chaves@uv.es.
11
Area of Cardiometabolic and Renal Risk, Biomedical Research Institute Hospital Clinic of Valencia (INCLIVA), Valencia, Spain; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

Inorganic arsenic exposure may be associated with diabetes, but the evidence at low-moderate levels is not sufficient. Polymorphisms in diabetes-related genes have been involved in diabetes risk. We evaluated the association of inorganic arsenic exposure on diabetes in the Hortega Study, a representative sample of a general population from Valladolid, Spain. Total urine arsenic was measured in 1451 adults. Urine arsenic speciation was available in 295 randomly selected participants. To account for the confounding introduced by non-toxic seafood arsenicals, we designed a multiple imputation model to predict the missing arsenobetaine levels. The prevalence of diabetes was 8.3%. The geometric mean of total arsenic was 66.0 μg/g. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for diabetes comparing the highest with the lowest tertile of total arsenic were 1.76 (1.01, 3.09) and 2.14 (1.47, 3.11) before and after arsenobetaine adjustment, respectively. Polymorphisms in several genes including IL8RA, TXN, NR3C2, COX5A and GCLC showed suggestive differential associations of urine total arsenic with diabetes. The findings support the role of arsenic on diabetes and the importance of controlling for seafood arsenicals in populations with high seafood intake. Suggestive arsenic-gene interactions require confirmation in larger studies.

KEYWORDS:

Arsenic; Arsenic species; Diabetes; Gene-environment interaction; Multiple imputation

PMID:
29751399
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2018.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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