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Phytother Res. 2018 Sep;32(9):1653-1663. doi: 10.1002/ptr.6101. Epub 2018 May 10.

Echinacea plants as antioxidant and antibacterial agents: From traditional medicine to biotechnological applications.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Parasitology, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran.
2
Department of Agricultural Engineering and Veterinary Medicine, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon.
3
Laboratório de Microbiologia e Biologia Molecular - LMBM, Departamento de Química Biológica - DQB, Universidade Regional do Cariri - URCA, Av. Cel. Antonio Luiz, 1161. Pimenta, Crato, CE, Brazil.
4
Medical Ethics and Law Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
Student Research Committee, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
6
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Pharmacy, University of Concepcion, Concepcion, Chile.
7
Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto Universitario de Investigación en Química Fina y Nanoquímica IUIQFN, Universidad de Córdoba, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Córdoba, E-14071, Spain.
8
Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India.
9
Departamento de Farmacia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia.
10
Department of Botany, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore, Pakistan.
11
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Milan State University, Milan, Italy.
12
Phytochemistry Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
13
Department of Chemistry, Richardson College for the Environmental Science Complex, The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Abstract

The genus Echinacea consists of 11 taxa of herbaceous and perennial flowering plants. In particular, Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench is widely cultivated all over the United States, Canada, and in Europe, exclusively in Germany, for its beauty and reported medicinal properties. Echinacea extracts have been used traditionally as wound healing to improve the immune system and to treat respiratory symptoms caused by bacterial infections. Echinacea extracts have demonstrated antioxidant and antimicrobial activities, and to be safe. This survey aims at reviewing the medicinal properties of Echinacea species, their cultivation, chemical composition, and the potential uses of these plants as antioxidant and antibacterial agents in foods and in a clinical context. Moreover, the factors affecting the chemical composition of Echinacea spp. are also covered.

KEYWORDS:

Asteraceae; Echinacea purpurea; ethnobotany; ethnopharmacology; herbal remedies; immunomodulatory activity

PMID:
29749084
DOI:
10.1002/ptr.6101
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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