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J Pediatr. 2018 May 7. pii: S0022-3476(18)30381-0. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.03.034. [Epub ahead of print]

Timing and Stability of Fellowship Choices during Pediatric Residency: A Longitudinal Survey.

Author information

1
Child Health Evaluation and Research (CHEAR) Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
2
The American Board of Pediatric Foundation, Chapel Hill, NC.
3
Division of Respiratory Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
4
Child Health Evaluation and Research (CHEAR) Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
5
Child Health Evaluation and Research (CHEAR) Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Department of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Electronic address: gfreed@med.umich.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine, among pediatric residents, the timing and stability of decisions to pursue fellowship training and select a specific subspecialty, which can be used to inform strategies to better match the distribution of pediatric subspecialist with the needs of children.

STUDY DESIGN:

A longitudinal survey administered with the General Pediatrics In-training Exam to pediatric residents in the US and Canada, 2010-2014. The study included residents who responded in each of their first 3 years of residency and indicated plans to enter fellowship or matriculated, 2013-2016, into 1 of the 14 medical subspecialty fellowships for which the American Board of Pediatrics grants a certificate. Descriptive and χ2 statistics were calculated.

RESULTS:

Of the 7580 residents who completed 3 annual surveys (response rate 99%) 4963 (65.5%) indicated plans to pursue fellowship training and 2843 (37.5%) matriculated into fellowship. Residents who did not enter fellowship were in smaller residency programs and programs with less interest in fellowship among interns. Most residents who matriculated into fellowship (68.4%) planned to do so as interns and maintained that plan throughout residency. In contrast, 22.7% had selected a specific subspecialty as interns. Fellowship decisions were made later in residency by female residents, American Medical Graduates, and residents in programs where <50% of interns planned to pursue fellowship training. Timing and stability of decisions varied across subspecialty fields.

CONCLUSIONS:

Understanding the timing of pediatric medical subspecialty fellowship decisions could be used to shape medical education and, ultimately, the pediatric workforce.

KEYWORDS:

workforce

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