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Environ Int. 2018 Aug;117:132-138. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2018.04.041. Epub 2018 May 7.

Critical knowledge gaps and research needs related to the environmental dimensions of antibiotic resistance.

Author information

1
Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsgatan 10A, SE-413 46 Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsdsgatan 10A, SE-413 46, Sweden. Electronic address: joakim.larsson@fysiologi.gu.se.
2
INSERM, IAME, UMR 1137, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75018 Paris, France.
3
Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsgatan 10A, SE-413 46 Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsdsgatan 10A, SE-413 46, Sweden. Electronic address: johan.bengtsson-palme@gu.se.
4
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg, Denmark. Electronic address: kkb@plen.ku.dk.
5
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80175, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands; Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. Electronic address: ana.maria.de.roda.husman@rivm.nl.
6
Swedish Research Council, Box 1035, SE-101 38 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: patriq.fagerstedt@vr.se.
7
Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: jerker.fick@umu.se.
8
Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsgatan 10A, SE-413 46 Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsdsgatan 10A, SE-413 46, Sweden. Electronic address: carl-fredrik.flach@microbio.gu.se.
9
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, University of Exeter Medical School, Knowledge Spa, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3HD, UK. Electronic address: w.h.gaze@exeter.ac.uk.
10
National Institute of Infectious Diseases, 4-7-1 Gakuen, Musashimurayama, Tokyo 208-0011, Japan. Electronic address: makokuro@niid.go.jp.
11
Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsgatan 10A, SE-413 46 Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsdsgatan 10A, SE-413 46, Sweden. Electronic address: kristian.kvint@gu.se.
12
Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy, Washington, DC, United States. Electronic address: ramanan@cddep.org.
13
Universidade Católica Portuguesa, CBQF - Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina - Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Rua Arquiteto Lobão Vital, Apartado 2511, 4202-401 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: cmanaia@porto.ucp.pt.
14
Department of Life Sciences and Health, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, 0130 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: kaare.nielsen@hioa.no.
15
Swedish Research Council, Box 1035, SE-101 38 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: Laura.plant@vr.se.
16
Université Limoges, INSERM, CHU Limoges, UMR 1092, Limoges, France. Electronic address: marie-cecile.ploy@unilim.fr.
17
Unidad funcional de Acreditación de Institutos de Investigación Sanitaria, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Spain. Electronic address: csegovia@isciii.es.
18
Environmental Microbial Genomics Group, Laboratory Ampère, UMR CNRS 5005, École Centrale de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Écully Cedex, France. Electronic address: pascal.simonet@ec-lyon.fr.
19
Julius Kühn-Institut, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Epidemiology and Pathogen Diagnostics, Messeweg 11-12, 38104 Braunschweig, Germany. Electronic address: kornelia.smalla@julius-kuehn.de.
20
Global Environment, AstraZeneca, Cheshire SK10 4TF, UK; School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK. Electronic address: jason.snape@astrazeneca.com.
21
London Research and Development Center, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N5V 4T3, Canada. Electronic address: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca.
22
Directorate Health, Directorate-General for Research and Innovation, European Commission, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: adrianus.van-hengel@ec.europa.eu.
23
Cefas Weymouth Laboratory, Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Weymouth, Dorset DT4 8UB, UK. Electronic address: david.verner-jeffreys@cefas.co.uk.
24
Department of Microbiology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: marko.virta@helsinki.fi.
25
School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK. Electronic address: e.m.h.wellington@warwick.ac.uk.
26
Swedish Agency for Marine and Water Management, Box 11 930, SE-404 39 Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: ann-sofie.wernersson@havochvatten.se.

Abstract

There is growing understanding that the environment plays an important role both in the transmission of antibiotic resistant pathogens and in their evolution. Accordingly, researchers and stakeholders world-wide seek to further explore the mechanisms and drivers involved, quantify risks and identify suitable interventions. There is a clear value in establishing research needs and coordinating efforts within and across nations in order to best tackle this global challenge. At an international workshop in late September 2017, scientists from 14 countries with expertise on the environmental dimensions of antibiotic resistance gathered to define critical knowledge gaps. Four key areas were identified where research is urgently needed: 1) the relative contributions of different sources of antibiotics and antibiotic resistant bacteria into the environment; 2) the role of the environment, and particularly anthropogenic inputs, in the evolution of resistance; 3) the overall human and animal health impacts caused by exposure to environmental resistant bacteria; and 4) the efficacy and feasibility of different technological, social, economic and behavioral interventions to mitigate environmental antibiotic resistance.1.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; Environmental pollution; Infectious diseases; Risk assessment; Risk management

PMID:
29747082
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2018.04.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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