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Epilepsy Behav. 2018 Jul;84:37-43. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.02.032. Epub 2018 May 7.

Optimizing parents' performance in anticonvulsant rescue medication administration.

Author information

1
Drug Safety Center and Dept. of Clinical Pharmacy, Leipzig University, Brüderstraße 32, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: pia.schumacher@uni-leipzig.de.
2
Drug Safety Center and Dept. of Clinical Pharmacy, Leipzig University, Brüderstraße 32, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: almuth.kaune@uni-leipzig.de.
3
University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Centre of Pediatric Research, Liebigstraße 20a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: andreas.merkenschlager@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
4
University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Centre of Pediatric Research, Liebigstraße 20a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: matthias.bernhard@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
5
University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Centre of Pediatric Research, Liebigstraße 20a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: wieland.kiess@medizin.uni-leipig.de.
6
Drug Safety Center and Dept. of Clinical Pharmacy, Leipzig University, Brüderstraße 32, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: martina.neininger@uni-leipzig.de.
7
University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Centre of Pediatric Research, Liebigstraße 20a, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: astrid.bertsche@medizin.uni-leipzig.de.
8
Drug Safety Center and Dept. of Clinical Pharmacy, Leipzig University, Brüderstraße 32, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: thilo.bertsche@uni-leipzig.de.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Parents of children with epilepsy are at risk of committing high-risk handling errors with a high potential to harm the patient when administering anticonvulsant rescue medication. We developed a training concept addressing identified high-risk handling errors and investigated its effects on parents' skills.

STUDY DESIGN:

In a controlled prospective intervention study, parents of children with epilepsy were asked to demonstrate their administration of rescue medication by using dummy dolls. A clinical pharmacist monitored rectal or buccal administration and addressed errors in the intervention group with training and information sheets. Three to 6weeks later, intervention's sustainability was assessed at a home visit.

RESULTS:

One hundred sixty-one parents completed full study assessment: 92 in the intervention group and 69 in the control group. The number of processes with at least one handling error was reduced from 96.4% to 56.7% in rectal tube administration and from 66.7% to 13.5% in buccal administration (both p<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

A one-time intervention for parents significantly and sustainably reduced high-risk handling errors. Dummy dolls and information sheet were adequate for an effective and feasible training to support the correct administration of anticonvulsant rescue medication.

KEYWORDS:

Dummy dolls; Pharmaceutical intervention; Practical drug handling; Rescue medication administration; Seizure management

PMID:
29747033
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.02.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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