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Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Nov 28;67(12):1878-1882. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciy379.

Association of Cutibacterium avidum Colonization in the Groin With Obesity: A Potential Risk Factor for Hip Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital Zurich.
2
Department of Orthopedics, University Hospital Balgrist.
3
Institute of Medical Microbiology, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Background:

An increase in the incidence of hip periprosthetic joint infections caused by Cutibacterium avidum has recently been detected after hip arthroplasty with an anterior surgical approach. We raised the question of whether skin colonization with C. avidum differs between the anterior and the lateral thigh as areas of surgical incision fields.

Methods:

Between February and June 2017, we analyzed skin scrapings from the groin and the anterior and lateral thigh in patients undergoing a primary hip arthroplasty. We anaerobically cultured plated swab samples for Cutibacterium spp. for ≥7 days. Univariate logistic regression analysis was used to explore associations between body mass index (BMI) and colonization rate at different sites.

Results:

Twenty-one of 65 patients (32.3%) were colonized with C. avidum at any site, mainly at the groin (n = 16; 24.6%), which was significantly higher at the anterior (n = 5; 7.7%; P = .009) or lateral (n = 6; 9.2%; P = .02) thigh. Patients colonized with C. avidum did not differ from noncolonized patients in age or sex, but their BMIs were significantly higher (30.1 vs 25.6 kg/m2, respectively; P = .02). Furthermore, increased BMI was associated with colonization at the groin (odds ratio per unit BMI increase, 1.15; 95% confidence interval; 1.03-1.29; P = .01).

Conclusions:

The groin, rather than the anterior thigh, showed colonization for C. avidum in obese patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate current skin disinfection and draping protocols for hip arthroplasty, particularly in obese patients.

PMID:
29746626
DOI:
10.1093/cid/ciy379

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