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AIDS Behav. 2018 Oct;22(10):3287-3295. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-2136-z.

Social Support and Violence-prone Relationships as Predictors of Disclosure of HIV Status Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-positive South Africans.

Author information

1
Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. jfifield@ariadnelabs.org.
2
Ariadne Labs, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. jfifield@ariadnelabs.org.
3
, 401 Park Drive, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. jfifield@ariadnelabs.org.
4
Department of Psychology, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada.
5
Epidemiology & Biostatistics Program, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, City University of New York, New York, NY, USA.
6
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
7
South African Medical Research Council, HIV Prevention Research Unit, Durban, South Africa.
8
Ibis Reproductive Health, Cambridge, MA, USA.
9
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Despite the salience of social support and violence as potential outcomes of disclosure, how pre-existing social support and relationship violence among people living with HIV shapes and influences HIV status disclosure has received limited attention. Following the Disclosure Process Model, this study investigated pre-disclosure support and violence-prone relationships as predictors of disclosure using data from a prospective study of 459 newly diagnosed South African women and men. Most (88%) disclosed their status to at least one person by their 8-month interview. Level of social support was unrelated to disclosure to a partner. However, those with higher levels of support had higher odds of disclosing to family and to others. Women in violence-prone relationships were more likely to report disclosure to a partner than were those not in such relationships, counter to expectations. The findings suggest that the same mechanisms may not explain processes of disclosure across all relationship types.

KEYWORDS:

HIV disclosure; PLWH; Social support; Violence-prone relationships

PMID:
29744766
PMCID:
PMC6226379
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-2136-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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