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J Exerc Rehabil. 2018 Apr 26;14(2):259-266. doi: 10.12965/jer.1836044.022. eCollection 2018 Apr.

A study on the immediate effects of plantar vibration on balance dysfunction in patients with stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Rehabilitation, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Sports Medicine Research Center, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3
Neuromusculoskeletal Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
4
Department of Physical therapy, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
Industrial Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.
6
Department of Physical Therapy, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to estimate the immediate effects of plantar vibration, applied to the more affected foot, on balance impairment in patients post-stroke. This pretest-posttest clinical study included 18 patients (13 men) poststroke; mean age 56.0±8.9 years (range, 41-71 years). One session of 5-min vibratory stimuli (frequency, 100 Hz) was applied to the plantar region of the more affected foot of all participants. The plantar vibration significantly improved the Timed UP and Go test (P=0.03, Cohen d=0.15), ankle plantar flexor muscle spasticity (P=0.008), and ankle passive range of motion (P<0.001, Cohen d=0.74). The posturography measures and Functional Reach Test did not improve significantly (P>0.05). Vibration stimuli applied to the plantar region of the more affected foot had significant effects on spasticity, ankle passive range of motion and dynamic balance as evaluated by the Timed Up and Go test in patients poststroke. There was no effect on static balance performance. Based on the results, the focal vibratory stimuli applied directly to the plantar region of the more affected foot may be recommended to improve the functional mobility and dynamic balance in patients with stroke.

KEYWORDS:

Balance; Physiotherapy; Posturography; Spasticity; Stroke; Vibration

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICT OF INTEREST No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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