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Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2018;27(3):527-532. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.082017.02.

Malnutrition and chronic inflammation as risk factors for sarcopenia in elderly patients with hip fracture.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Korea.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. hayongch@naver.com.
3
Department of Rehabilitation, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.
4
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
5
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang, Korea.
6
Department of Preventive Medicine and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate malnutrition and chronic inflammation as risk factors for sarcopenia in elderly patients with hip fractures, as defined by the criteria of the Asian Working Group on Sarcopenia (AWGS).

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN:

A total of 327 elderly patients with hip fractures were enrolled in this retrospective observational study. The main outcome measure was the nutritional status and nutritional risk factors for sarcopenia in elderly patients. Diagnosis of sarcopenia was made according to the guidelines of the AWGS. Whole body densitometry analysis was used to measure skeletal muscle mass, and muscle strength was evaluated by handgrip testing. Multivariable regression analysis was utilized to analyze the nutritional risk factors for sarcopenia in patients with hip fractures.

RESULTS:

Of 327 patients with hip fractures (78 men and 249 women), the prevalence of sarcopenia was 60.3% and 30.1% in men and women, respectively. The rates of three indicators of malnutrition in men and women (low BMI, hypoalbuminemia, and hypoproteinemia) in sarcopenia patients with hip fractures were 23.4%, 31.9%, and 53.2% and 21.3%, 21.3%, and 37.3%, respectively. The prevalence of markers of chronic inflammation (increased CRP and ESR) in men and women with sarcopenia and hip fractures were 74.9% and 52.2%, and 49.3% and 85.1%, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, low BMI and hypoproteinemia in women were associated with a 2.9- and 2.1-fold greater risk of sarcopenia than non-sarcopenia, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study revealed a strong relationship between sarcopenia and malnutrition and chronic inflammatory factors in elderly patients with hip fractures.

PMID:
29737798
DOI:
10.6133/apjcn.082017.02
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