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J Clin Sleep Med. 2018 May 15;14(5):877-880. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.7128.

Consumer Sleep Technology: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement.

Author information

1
North Dakota Center for Sleep, Fargo, North Dakota.
2
eviCore Healthcare, Bluffton, South Carolina.
3
Greenville Health System, University of South Carolina, Greenville, South Carolina.
4
University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
5
Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente Fontana Sleep Disorders Center, Fontana, California.
6
Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.
7
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
8
Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
9
UR Medicine Sleep Center, Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York.
10
Carolinas Healthcare Medical Group Sleep Services, Charlotte, North Carolina.
11
Saint Thomas Medical Partners - Sleep Specialists, Nashville, Tennessee.
12
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
13
Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
14
University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
15
Washington University Sleep Center, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri.
16
Veteran Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health System, North Hills, California.
17
David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, California.
18
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals - Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.
19
Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

Abstract

Consumer sleep technologies (CSTs) are widespread applications and devices that purport to measure and even improve sleep. Sleep clinicians may frequently encounter CST in practice and, despite lack of validation against gold standard polysomnography, familiarity with these devices has become a patient expectation. This American Academy of Sleep Medicine position statement details the disadvantages and potential benefits of CSTs and provides guidance when approaching patient-generated health data from CSTs in a clinical setting. Given the lack of validation and United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance, CSTs cannot be utilized for the diagnosis and/or treatment of sleep disorders at this time. However, CSTs may be utilized to enhance the patient-clinician interaction when presented in the context of an appropriate clinical evaluation. The ubiquitous nature of CSTs may further sleep research and practice. However, future validation, access to raw data and algorithms, and FDA oversight are needed.

KEYWORDS:

consumer sleep technology; patient-generated health data (PGHD); polysomnography

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