Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurosci Lett. 2018 Jun 21;678:62-67. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2018.05.003. Epub 2018 May 2.

Effects of systemic cholinergic antagonism on reinforcer devaluation in macaques.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University, New Research Bldg., 3970 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20007, USA. Electronic address: hgf6@georgetown.edu.
2
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University, New Research Bldg., 3970 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20007, USA. Electronic address: malkoval@georgetown.edu.
3
Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University, New Research Bldg., 3970 Reservoir Rd. NW, Washington, DC 20007, USA. Electronic address: paf22@georgetown.edu.
4
Laboratory of Neuropsychology, NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: turchij@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

The capacity to adjust actions based on new information is a vital cognitive function. An animal's ability to adapt behavioral responses according to changes in reward value can be measured using a reinforcer devaluation task, wherein the desirability of a given object is reduced by decreasing the value of the associated food reinforcement. Elements of the neural circuits serving this ability have been studied in both rodents and nonhuman primates. Specifically, the basolateral amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and mediodorsal thalamus have each been shown to play a critical role in the process of value updating, required for adaptive goal selection. As these regions receive dense cholinergic input, we investigated whether systemic injections of non-selective nicotinic or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, mecamylamine and scopolamine, respectively, would impair performance on a reinforcer devaluation task. Here we demonstrate that in the presence of either a nicotinic or muscarinic antagonist, animals are able to shift their behavioral responses in an appropriate manner, suggesting that disruption of cholinergic neuromodulation is not sufficient to disrupt value updating, and subsequent goal selection, in rhesus macaques.

KEYWORDS:

Acetylcholine; Behavioral flexibility; Muscarinic receptor; Nicotinic receptor

PMID:
29729357
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2018.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center