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Ethn Dis. 2018 Apr 26;28(2):105-114. doi: 10.18865/ed.28.2.105. eCollection 2018 Spring.

Daily and Nondaily Smoking Varies by Acculturation among English-Speaking, US Latino Men and Women.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA.
2
Center for Cancer Disparities, Hackensack Meridian Health, Hackensack, NJ.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS.
4
Department of Statistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
5
Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI.

Abstract

Background:

Higher smoking prevalence and quantity (cigarettes per day) has been linked to acculturation in the United States among Latinas, but not Latino men. Our study examines variation between a different and increasingly important target behavior, smoking level (nondaily vs daily) and acculturation by sex.

Methods:

An online English-language survey was administered to 786 Latino smokers during July through August 2012. The Brief Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican Americans-II (ARSMA-II) and other acculturation markers were used. Multinomial logistic regression models were implemented to assess the association between smoking levels (nondaily, light daily, and moderate/heavy daily) with acculturation markers.

Results:

Greater ARMSA-II scores (relative risk ratio, RRR=.81, 95% CI: .72-.91) and being born inside the United States (RRR=.42, 95% CI: .24-.74) were associated with lower relative risk of nondaily smoking. Greater Latino orientation (RRR=1.29, 95% CI: 1.11-1.48) and preference for Spanish language (RRR=1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10) and media (RRR=1.12, 95% CI: 1.05-1.20) were associated with higher relative risk of nondaily smoking. The relationship between acculturation and smoking level did not differ by sex.

Conclusion:

This study found that among both male and female, English-speaking Latino smokers, nondaily smoking was associated with lower acculturation, while daily smoking was linked with higher acculturation.

KEYWORDS:

Culture; Gender; Health; Hispanic Americans; Intermittent Smoking; Tobacco

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