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Vaccine. 2018 May 31;36(23):3221-3230. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.04.080. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Final analysis of a study assessing genital human papillomavirus genoprevalence in young Australian women, following eight years of a national vaccination program.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Parkville, Vic 3052, Australia; Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Road, Parkville 3052, Australia; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3052, Australia. Electronic address: suzanne.garland@thewomens.org.au.
2
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Road, Parkville 3052, Australia.
3
VCS Registries, Victorian Cytology Service Ltd., Level 6, 176 Wellington Parade, East Melbourne 3002, Australia; School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3052, Australia.
4
University of Melbourne Department of Medicine, Australia; Bone and Mineral Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Vic. 3050, Australia.
5
Department of Microbiology & Infectious Diseases, Royal Women's Hospital, Locked Bag 300, Parkville, Vic 3052, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The VACCINE [Vaccine Against Cervical Cancer Impact and Effectiveness] study evaluated the prevalence of quadrivalent vaccine-targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes (HPV 6, 11, 16, 18) amongst young women of vaccine-eligible age.

METHODS:

Between October 2011 - June 2015, women aged 18-25 years from Victoria, Australia, were recruited through targeted advertising on the social networking website Facebook. Participants completed an online questionnaire and provided a self-collected vaginal swab for HPV DNA detection and genotyping (Linear Array HPV genotyping assay). Self-reported HPV vaccination details were verified with the National HPV Vaccination Program Register (NHVPR).

RESULTS:

Of 1223 who agreed to participate, 916 (74.9%) completed the survey and, for 1007 (82.3%) sexually-active participants, 744 (73.9%) returned the self-collected swab, of which 737 contained detectable DNA. 184/737 (25.0%) were positive for HPV. Vaccine-targeted HPV genotypes were detected in only 13 (1.7%) women: 11 HPV 16 (six vaccinated after sexual debut, five unvaccinated) and two HPV 6. Prevalence of any of HPV 31/33/45 collectively was 2.9%, varying significantly by vaccination status (fully 2.0%, unvaccinated 6.8%; p = 0.01). Vaccination rates among the sexually-active cohort were high, with 65.6%, 71.6% and 74.2% of participants having received three, at least two or at least one dose of vaccine, respectively. Of women self-reporting HPV vaccination, the NHVPR confirmed one or more doses were received in 90%. Strong associations were observed between vaccination status, age, language spoken at home and country of birth, as well as between HPV detection and the number of male sexual partners.

CONCLUSION:

Surveillance five to eight years' post-initiation of a national HPV vaccination program demonstrated a consistent and very low prevalence of vaccine-related HPV genotypes and some evidence of cross protection against related types amongst vaccine-eligible women from Victoria, Australia.

KEYWORDS:

Australia; Genoprevalence; HPV; Post-vaccination; Social network site recruitment; Young women

PMID:
29724506
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.04.080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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