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Neuron. 2018 May 2;98(3):482-494. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2018.03.023.

Peripheral and Central Mechanisms of Itch.

Author information

1
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience and the Center for Sensory Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address: xdong11@jhmi.edu.
2
The Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience and the Center for Sensory Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. Electronic address: xdong2@jhmi.edu.

Abstract

Itch is a unique sensory experience that is encoded by genetically distinguishable neurons both in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) to elicit a characteristic behavioral response (scratching). Itch interacts with the other sensory modalities at multiple locations, from its initiation in a particular dermatome to its transmission to the brain where it is finally perceived. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the molecular and neural mechanisms of itch by starting in the periphery, where itch is initiated, and discussing the circuits involved in itch processing in the CNS.

KEYWORDS:

G protein-coupled receptors; TRP channels; cytokines; dorsal root ganglia; itch; mast cells; neuroimmunology; pain; sensory neuron; spinal cord

PMID:
29723501
PMCID:
PMC6022762
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2018.03.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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