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PLoS One. 2018 May 3;13(5):e0196709. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0196709. eCollection 2018.

Lipidomic profiling reveals free fatty acid alterations in plasma from patients with atrial fibrillation.

Author information

1
Integrated Metabolomics Research Group, Western Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Life Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.
4
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Chemistry & Nanoscience, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its incidence is increasing worldwide. One method used to restore sinus rhythm is direct current cardioversion (DCCV). Despite the high success rate of DCCV, AF typically recurs within the first 2 weeks. However, our understanding of the pathophysiology of AF recurrence, incidence, and progression are highly limited. Lipidomic profiling was applied to identify altered lipids in plasma from patients with AF using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with multivariate statistical analysis. Partial least-squares discriminant analysis revealed a clear separation between AF patients and healthy controls. The levels of several lipid species, including fatty acids and phospholipids, were different between AF patients and healthy controls, indicating that oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with the pathogenesis of AF. Similar patterns were also detected between recurrent and non-recurrent AF patients. These results suggest that the elevated saturated fatty acid and reduced polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in AF patients may be associated with enhanced inflammation and that free fatty acid levels may play a crucial role in the development and progression of AF.

PMID:
29723222
PMCID:
PMC5933795
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0196709
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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