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Sci Rep. 2018 May 2;8(1):6935. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-25281-3.

Exploring Leptospiral proteomes to identify potential candidates for vaccine design against Leptospirosis using an immunoinformatics approach.

Author information

1
Gujarat Institute of Bioinformatics, Gujarat State Biotechnology Mission, Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, 382011, India.
2
Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre (GBRC), Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, 382011, India.
3
Gujarat State Biotechnology Mission, Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, 382011, India.
4
Gujarat State Biotechnology Mission, Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, 382011, India. jayshankardas@gmail.com.
5
Gujarat Biotechnology Research Centre (GBRC), Department of Science & Technology, Government of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, 382011, India. jayshankardas@gmail.com.

Abstract

Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonotic disease, estimated to cause severe infection in more than one million people each year, particularly in developing countries of tropical areas. Several factors such as variable and nonspecific clinical manifestation, existence of large number of serovars and asymptomatic hosts spreading infection, poor sanitation and lack of an effective vaccine make prophylaxis difficult. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop an effective vaccine to halt its spread all over the world. In this study, an immunoinformatics approach was employed to identify the most vital and effective immunogenic protein from the proteome of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain L1-130 that may be suitable to stimulate a significant immune response aiding in the development of peptide vaccine against leptospirosis. Both B-cell and T-cell (Helper T-lymphocyte (HTL) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)) epitopes were predicted for the conserved and most immunogenic outer membrane lipoprotein. Further, the binding interaction of CTL epitopes with Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) was evaluated using docking techniques. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation study was also performed to evaluate the stability of the resulting epitope-MHC-I complexes. Overall, this study provides novel vaccine candidates and may prompt further development of vaccines against leptospirosis.

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