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J Infect Dis. 2018 Aug 14;218(6):922-926. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy244.

Increased Systemic Inflammation and Gut Permeability Among Women With Treated HIV Infection in Rural Uganda.

Author information

1
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Uganda.
4
University of Vermont, Burlington.
5
University of California, San Francisco.
6
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

Abstract

In a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and age- and sex-matched HIV-uninfected comparators, we assessed soluble CD14 (sCD14), sCD163, interleukin 6, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFAPB), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels. The median age was 51 years. Among HIV-positive individuals, the median antiretroviral therapy (ART) duration was 7 years, the median CD4+ T-cell count was 433 cells/μL, and 86% had an undetectable viral load. Although HIV-positive individuals had higher sCD14, IFABP, and hs-CRP levels, we found evidence of interaction by sex, such that HIV-positive women had greater differences from HIV-negative women, compared with differences between HIV-positive men and HIV-negative men. In models restricted to HIV-positive individuals, women had higher levels of all 5 biomarkers than men.

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