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J Crohns Colitis. 2018 Apr 27;12(5):600-609. doi: 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy024.

Burden of Ulcerative Colitis on Functioning and Well-being: A Systematic Literature Review of the SF-36® Health Survey.

Author information

1
Optum, Johnston, RI, USA.
2
University of Chicago Medicine, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERehd, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Centre for Immunobiology, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.
5
Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
6
Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA.
7
New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
8
Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Background and Aims:

This review is the first to evaluate the burden of ulcerative colitis [UC] on patients' quality of life by synthesizing data from studies comparing scores from the SF-36® Health Survey, a generic measure assessing eight quality-of-life domains, between UC patients and matched reference samples.

Methods:

A systematic review of the published literature identified articles reporting SF-36 domains or physical and mental component summary scores [PCS, MCS] from UC and reference samples. Burden of disease for each SF-36 domain was then summarized across studies by comparing weighted mean differences in scores between patient and reference samples with minimally important difference thresholds.

Results:

Thirty articles met pre-specified inclusion criteria. SF-36 scores were extracted from five samples of patients with active disease, 11 samples with a mixture of disease activity, five samples of patients in clinical remission, and 13 samples of patients following proctocolectomy with ileostomy or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, along with respective reference samples. Clinically meaningful burden was observed in samples with active or mixed disease activity [deficits: PCS = 5.6, MCS = 5.5] on all SF-36 domains except Physical Functioning. No burden was observed in samples in remission or post-surgical patients [deficits: PCS = 0.8, MCS = 0.4] except for the General Health perception domain.

Conclusions:

Patients with active UC experience a clinically meaningful burden of disease across most aspects of quality of life. Patients with inactive UC exhibit negligible disease burden and are comparable to the general population on most quality-of-life outcomes. Thus, treatments which effectively induce and maintain remission may restore physical and mental health status.

PMID:
29718244
DOI:
10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjy024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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