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Psychon Bull Rev. 2018 Aug;25(4):1494-1499. doi: 10.3758/s13423-018-1472-3.

Visual recognition of mirrored letters and the right hemisphere advantage for mirror-invariant object recognition.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Reno, 1664 N. Virginia Street, Mailstop 296, Reno, NV, 89557, USA. mt.harrison@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Reno, 1664 N. Virginia Street, Mailstop 296, Reno, NV, 89557, USA.

Abstract

Unlike most objects, letter recognition is closely tied to orientation and mirroring, which in some cases (e.g., b and d), defines letter identity altogether. We combined a divided field paradigm with a negative priming procedure to examine the relationship between mirror generalization, its suppression during letter recognition, and language-related visual processing in the left hemisphere. In our main experiment, observers performed a centrally viewed letter-recognition task, followed by an object-recognition task performed in either the right or the left visual hemifield. The results show clear evidence of inhibition of mirror generalization for objects viewed in either hemifield but a right hemisphere advantage for visual recognition of mirrored and repeated objects. Our findings are consistent with an opponent relationship between symmetry-related visual processing in the right hemisphere and neurally recycled mechanisms in the left hemisphere used for visual processing of written language stimuli.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebral laterality; Mirror generalization; Object recognition; Symmetry perception; Visual perception

PMID:
29717412
DOI:
10.3758/s13423-018-1472-3

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