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Cogn Emot. 2003 Mar;17(2):297-314. doi: 10.1080/02699930302297.

Approaching awe, a moral, spiritual, and aesthetic emotion.

Author information

1
a University of California at Berkeley, USA.
2
b University of Virginia, Charlottsville, USA.

Abstract

In this paper we present a prototype approach to awe. We suggest that two appraisals are central and are present in all clear cases of awe: perceived vastness, and a need for accommodation, defined as an inability to assimilate an experience into current mental structures. Five additional appraisals account for variation in the hedonic tone of awe experiences: threat, beauty, exceptional ability, virtue, and the supernatural. We derive this perspective from a review of what has been written about awe in religion, philosophy, sociology, and psychology, and then we apply this perspective to an analysis of awe and related states such as admiration, elevation, and the epiphanic experience.

PMID:
29715721
DOI:
10.1080/02699930302297

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