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Environ Pollut. 2018 Aug;239:706-713. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2018.04.054. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Evaluation of targeted and untargeted effects-based monitoring tools to assess impacts of contaminants of emerging concern on fish in the South Platte River, CO.

Author information

1
U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605, USA. Electronic address: ekman.drew@epa.gov.
2
U.S. EPA, National Enforcement Investigations Center, Denver Federal Center Building 25, E-3, Denver, CO 80225, USA. Electronic address: keteles.kristen@epa.gov.
3
U.S. EPA, National Enforcement Investigations Center, Denver Federal Center Building 25, E-3, Denver, CO 80225, USA. Electronic address: Beihoffer.jon@epa.gov.
4
Badger Technical Services, U.S. EPA, Duluth, MN 55804, USA. Electronic address: cavallin.jenna@epa.gov.
5
U.S. EPA, Region 8, 1595 Wynkoop St., Denver, CO 80202, USA. Electronic address: dahlin.kenneth@epa.gov.
6
U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605, USA. Electronic address: davis.john@epa.gov.
7
U.S. EPA, Region 5, Ralph Metcalfe Federal Building, 77 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60605, USA. Electronic address: jastrow.aaron@epa.gov.
8
U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 26 Martin Luther King Blvd., Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA. Electronic address: lazorchak.jim@epa.gov.
9
U.S. EPA, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 Martin Luther King Blvd., Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA. Electronic address: mills.marc@epa.gov.
10
U.S. EPA, Region 8, 1595 Wynkoop St., Denver, CO 80202, USA. Electronic address: murphy.mark@epa.gov.
11
U.S. EPA, Region 8, 1595 Wynkoop St., Denver, CO 80202, USA. Electronic address: nguyen.david@epa.gov.
12
University of Colorado Denver, Department of Integrative Biology, Campus Box 171, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217, USA. Electronic address: alan.vajda@ucdenver.edu.
13
U.S. EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Duluth, MN 55804, USA. Electronic address: villeneuve.dan@epa.gov.
14
U.S. Geological Survey, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, 201 J.V.K. Wagar Building, 1484 Campus Delivery, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Electronic address: dana.winkelman@colostate.edu.
15
U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605, USA. Electronic address: collette.tim@epa.gov.

Abstract

Rivers in the arid Western United States face increasing influences from anthropogenic contaminants due to population growth, urbanization, and drought. To better understand and more effectively track the impacts of these contaminants, biologically-based monitoring tools are increasingly being used to complement routine chemical monitoring. This study was initiated to assess the ability of both targeted and untargeted biologically-based monitoring tools to discriminate impacts of two adjacent wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on Colorado's South Platte River. A cell-based estrogen assay (in vitro, targeted) determined that water samples collected downstream of the larger of the two WWTPs displayed considerable estrogenic activity in its two separate effluent streams. Hepatic vitellogenin mRNA expression (in vivo, targeted) and NMR-based metabolomic analyses (in vivo, untargeted) from caged male fathead minnows also suggested estrogenic activity downstream of the larger WWTP, but detected significant differences in responses from its two effluent streams. The metabolomic results suggested that these differences were associated with oxidative stress levels. Finally, partial least squares regression was used to explore linkages between the metabolomics responses and the chemical contaminants that were detected at the sites. This analysis, along with univariate statistical approaches, identified significant covariance between the biological endpoints and estrone concentrations, suggesting the importance of this contaminant and recommending increased focus on its presence in the environment. These results underscore the benefits of a combined targeted and untargeted biologically-based monitoring strategy when used alongside contaminant monitoring to more effectively assess ecological impacts of exposures to complex mixtures in surface waters.

KEYWORDS:

Contaminants of emerging concern; Effects-based monitoring; Estrogens; Fish; Metabolomics; Vitellogenin

PMID:
29715690
PMCID:
PMC6147041
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.envpol.2018.04.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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