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Clin J Sport Med. 2019 Nov;29(6):506-508. doi: 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000555.

Urine Reagent Strips Are Inaccurate for Assessing Hypohydration: A Brief Report.

Author information

1
Hydration Science Lab, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas.
2
Department of Nutrition, Universidad Hispanoamericana, San José, Costa Rica.
3
Korey Stringer Institute, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut.
4
Department of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Statistics Laboratory, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas.
5
Division of Endocrinology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the diagnostic ability of urine reagent strips to identify hypohydration based on urine specific gravity (USG).

DESIGN:

This study examined the agreement of USG between strips and refractometry with Bland-Altman, whereas the diagnostic ability of the strips to assess hypohydration was performed by receiver operating characteristic analysis.

SETTING:

Arkansas high school football preseason practice.

PARTICIPANTS:

Four hundred fourteen fresh urine samples were analyzed.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Urine specific gravity was assessed by both reagent strips and refractometry. Cutoffs of >1.020 and >1.025 were used for identifying hypohydration.

RESULTS:

Bland-Altman analysis showed agreement of the 2 methods. Overall diagnostic ability of the urine strip to identify hypohydration was fair (area under the curve 72%-78%). However, the sensitivity to correctly identify hypohydration was poor (63%-71%), and the specificity of correctly identifying euhydration was poor to fair (68%-83%).

CONCLUSION:

The urine strip method is not valid for assessing hypohydration.

PMID:
29708888
DOI:
10.1097/JSM.0000000000000555
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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