Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 Aug;26(8):1094-1100. doi: 10.1038/s41431-018-0145-z. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Distress, uncertainty, and positive experiences associated with receiving information on personal genomic risk of melanoma.

Author information

1
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. amelia.smit@sydney.edu.au.
2
Sydney Health Ethics, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. amelia.smit@sydney.edu.au.
3
Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. amelia.smit@sydney.edu.au.
4
Sydney Health Ethics, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
5
Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
6
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
7
Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
8
Westmead Clinical School, and Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
9
The Centre for Genetics Education, NSW Health, Sydney, Australia.
10
Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

The aim of this research was to understand how genomics-based personal melanoma risk information impacts psychological and emotional health outcomes in the general population. In a pilot randomized controlled trial, participants (n = 103) completed the Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA) questionnaire, 3 months after receiving personal melanoma genomic risk information. Mean scores for MICRA items and subscales were stratified by genomic risk group (low, average, high), gender, education, age, and family history of melanoma. P values were obtained from t-tests and analysis of variance tests. We found that overall, participants (mean age: 53 years, range: 21-69; 52% female) had a total MICRA mean score of 18.6 (standard deviation: 11.1, range: 1-70; possible range: 0-105). The high genomic risk group had higher mean scores for the total (24.2, F2,100 = 6.7, P = 0.0019), distress (3.3, F2,100 = 9.4, P = 0.0002) and uncertainty (8.5, F2,100 = 6.5, P = 0.0021) subscales compared with average (17.6, 1.1, and 4.5, respectively) and low-risk groups (14.1, 0.5, and 2.5, respectively). Positive experiences scores were consistent across risk groups. In conclusion, MICRA scores for the total, distress and uncertainty subscales in our study were relatively low overall, but people who receive a high genomic risk result may benefit from increased support following testing.

PMID:
29706632
PMCID:
PMC6057946
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1038/s41431-018-0145-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center