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Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2018 May;31:262-267. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.03.008. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Effectiveness of yoga and educational intervention on disability, anxiety, depression, and pain in people with CLBP: A randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia; Sport Performance Laboratory, University of Split, Split, Croatia. Electronic address: gorkuv@kifst.hr.
2
Faculty of Psychology, eCampus University, Novedrate, Italy. Electronic address: fratinipatrizia0@gmail.com.
3
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia; Faculty of Psychology, eCampus University, Novedrate, Italy; Sport Performance Laboratory, University of Split, Split, Croatia. Electronic address: sportcinetic@gmail.com.
4
Sport Science Department, Maccabi Tel Aviv FC, Tel Aviv, Israel; Sport Performance Laboratory, University of Split, Split, Croatia; The Academic College at Wingate, Wingate Institute, Israel. Electronic address: antdelloiacono@virgilio.it.
5
Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia; Faculty of Psychology, eCampus University, Novedrate, Italy; Sport Performance Laboratory, University of Split, Split, Croatia. Electronic address: andrea.degiorgio@uniecampus.it.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The current study investigates the effects of an 8-week yoga program with educational intervention compared with an informational pamphlet on disability, anxiety, depression, and pain, in people affected by chronic low back pain (CLBP).

METHODS:

Thirty individuals (age 34.2 ± 4.52 yrs) with CLBP were randomly assigned into a Yoga Group (YG, n = 15) and a Pamphlet Group (PG, n = 15). The YG participated in an 8-week (2 days per week) yoga program which included education on spine anatomy/biomechanics and the management of CLBP.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Monitoring response to intervention, the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODI-I), Zung self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Numeric Rating Scale for Pain (NRS 0-10) were used to collect data.

RESULTS:

After intervention, the YG showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean score in all assessed variables when compared with baseline data. In addition, statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were observed among groups at the end of intervention in depression, anxiety, and pain, but not in disability.

CONCLUSIONS:

The yoga program and education together appear to be effective in reducing depression and anxiety, which can affect perception of pain.

KEYWORDS:

Emotions; Pamphlet; Patient-centered; Psychological factors

PMID:
29705466
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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