Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Res. 2018 Aug;165:150-157. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2018.04.018. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

Recall of mobile phone usage and laterality in young people: The multinational Mobi-Expo study.

Author information

1
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht, the Netherlands.
2
Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht, the Netherlands. Electronic address: l.vanwel@uu.nl.
3
ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; Biomedical Research Centre Network for Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
4
Chaire C2M, LTCI, Telecom ParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, France.
5
Epidemiological Research and Surveillance Unit in Transport, Occupation and Environment (UMRESTTE), Université de Lyon/The French Institute of science and technology for transport, development and networks (IFSTTAR), Lyon, France.
6
Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
7
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
8
Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Unit, Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
9
Department of Preventive Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.
10
Centre for Public Health Research, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand.
11
Department of Public Health, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.
12
School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Canada.
13
French National Registry of Childhood Solid Tumours, CHU, Nancy, Inserm UMRS-1153, CRESS-EPICEA, University of Paris-Sorbonne, Paris, France.
14
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin and AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Italy.
15
School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Canada; Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Canada; Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Canada.
16
Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology & NetTeaching Unit, Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital of Munich (LMU), Munich, Germany.
17
French National Registry of Childhood Solid Tumours, CHU, Nancy, France.
18
Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology Unit, Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study recall of mobile phone usage, including laterality and hands-free use, in young people.

METHODS:

Actual mobile phone use was recorded among volunteers aged between 10 and 24 years from 12 countries by the software application XMobiSense and was compared with self-reported mobile phone use at 6 and 18 months after using the application. The application recorded number and duration of voice calls, number of text messages, amount of data transfer, laterality (% of call time the phone was near the right or left side of the head, or neither), and hands-free usage. After data cleaning, 466 participants were available for the main analyses (recorded vs. self-reported phone use after 6 months).

RESULTS:

Participants were on average 18.6 years old (IQR 15.2-21.8 years). The Spearman correlation coefficients between recorded and self-reported (after 6 months) number and duration of voice calls were 0.68 and 0.65, respectively. Number of calls was on average underestimated by the participants (adjusted geometric mean ratio (GMR) self-report/recorded = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.47-0.58), while duration of calls was overestimated (GMR=1.32, 95%, CI = 1.15-1.52). The ratios significantly differed by country, age, maternal educational level, and level of reported phone use, but not by time of the interview (6 vs. 18 months). Individuals who reported low mobile phone use underestimated their use, while individuals who reported the highest level of phone use were more likely to overestimate their use. Individuals who reported using the phone mainly on the right side of the head used it more on the right (71.1%) than the left (28.9%) side. Self-reported left side users, however, used the phone only slightly more on the left (53.3%) than the right (46.7%) side. Recorded percentage hands-free use (headset, speaker mode, Bluetooth) increased with increasing self-reported frequency of hands-free device usage. Frequent (≥50% of call time) reported headset or speaker mode use corresponded with 17.1% and 17.2% of total call time, respectively, that was recorded as hands-free use.

DISCUSSION:

These results indicate that young people can recall phone use moderately well, with recall depending on the amount of phone use and participants' characteristics. The obtained information can be used to calibrate self-reported mobile use to improve estimation of radiofrequency exposure from mobile phones.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Child; Laterality; Mobile application; Mobile phone use; Validation study

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center