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Ann Epidemiol. 2018 Jun;28(6):362-367.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.03.021. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Early frailty transition predicts 15-year mortality among nondisabled older Mexican Americans.

Author information

1
Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA.
2
Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA; Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, UTMB, Galveston, USA.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, UTMB, Galveston, USA.
4
Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, USA. Electronic address: kottenba@utmb.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the effect of early frailty transitions on 15-year mortality risk.

METHODS:

Longitudinal data analysis of the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly involving 1171 community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged ≥67 years and older. Frailty was determined using the modified frailty phenotype, including unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported exhaustion, and slow walking speed. Participants were defined at baseline as nonfrail, prefrail, or frail and divided into nine transition groups, during a 3-year observation period.

RESULTS:

Mean age was 77.0 years (standard deviation [SD] = 5.3) and 59.1% were female. Participants who transitioned from prefrail to frail (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23-2.28), frail to prefrail (HR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.05-2.28); or who remained frail (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.21-2.44), had significant higher 15-year mortality risk than those who remained nonfrail. Participants transitioning from frail to nonfrail had a similar 15-year mortality risk as those who remained nonfrail (HR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.53-1.72). Weight loss and slow walking speed were associated with transitions to frailty.

CONCLUSIONS:

An early transition from frail to nonfrail in older Mexican Americans was associated with a 4% decrease in mortality compared with those who remained nonfrail, although this difference was not statistically significant. Additional longitudinal research is needed to understand positive transitions in frailty.

KEYWORDS:

Frail Elderly; Mexican Americans; Mortality

PMID:
29703521
PMCID:
PMC5971136
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.03.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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