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Curr Atheroscler Rep. 2018 Apr 25;20(6):26. doi: 10.1007/s11883-018-0729-7.

Preserving Cardiovascular Health in Young Children: Beginning Healthier by Starting Earlier.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 680 North Lake Shore Drive, #1400, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. lvanhorn@northwestern.edu.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 680 North Lake Shore Drive, #1400, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 680 N Lake Shore Drive, #1400, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The goals of this paper are to review current literature regarding maternal-fetal-pediatric diet and nutritional factors related to preserving cardiovascular health in the very young child and the emerging data implicating nutritional influences on neurodevelopmental factors. Questions related to maternal diet and influences of human milk on child's growth, neurodevelopment, and risk of developing obesity were addressed.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The majority of US women in their reproductive years have overweight or obese status thereby increasing the risk of developing obesity in their children. Efforts to restrict gestational weight gain, perpetuate breast-feeding, and introduce heart-healthy complementary feeding after 6 months of age are now more commonly recommended and offer practical translational approaches to prevent pediatric obesity and encourage neurodevelopment intended to support cognitive and executive function. There is growing literature on the role of maternal-fetal-pediatric nutrition on cardiometabolic and neurodevelopmental health in children. Potential influences of maternal diet quality and obesity on not only birth outcomes but subsequent risk factor development in the child are increasingly apparent. Further investigation of these factors has become a major research focus in developing future diet recommendations to better inform underlying potential mechanisms and identify opportunities for primary prevention starting in utero.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiometabolic risk; Maternal diet; Pediatric obesity

PMID:
29696447
DOI:
10.1007/s11883-018-0729-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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