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Chin Med J (Engl). 2018 May 5;131(9):1034-1037. doi: 10.4103/0366-6999.230738.

Impact of Smoking on Anal Abscess and Anal Fistula Diseases.

Author information

1
Proctology Department, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing 100029, China.
2
Centre for Respiratory Diseases, China-Japan Friendship Hospital; Tobacco Medicine and Tobacco Cessation Centre, China-Japan Friendship Hospital; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tobacco Cessation and Respiratory Diseases Prevention, China-Japan Friendship Hospital; National Clinical Research Centre for Respiratory Diseases, Beijing 100029, China.
3
Centre for Respiratory Diseases, China-Japan Friendship Hospital; WHO Collaborating Centre for Tobacco Cessation and Respiratory Diseases Prevention, China-Japan Friendship Hospital; National Clinical Research Centre for Respiratory Diseases; Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China.

Abstract

in English, Chinese

Background:

Several studies have investigated the association between smoking and anal abscess and anal fistula (AA/F) diseases. However, the relationship between cigarette smoking and AA/F remains unclear. This study sought to assess the role of smoking in anorectal male patients in a Chinese population.

Methods:

In this retrospective study, a questionnaire, including smoking history, was completed over a 3-month period by male inpatients in the Proctology Department of China-Japan Friendship Hospital. "Cases" were patients who had AA/F, and "controls" were patients with other anorectal complaints. Mann-Whitney U-test and Chi-square test were carried out to examine differences in baseline characteristics between groups. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression was used to explore any related factors.

Results:

A total of 977 patients aged from 18 to 80 years were included, excluding those diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease or diabetes mellitus. Out of this total, 805 patients (82.4%) completed the entire questionnaire. Among the 805 patients, 334 (41.5%) were cases and 471 (58.5%) were controls. Results showed significant differences between cases and controls (χ2 = 205.2, P < 0.001), with smoking found to be associated with the development of AA/F diseases (odds ratio: 12.331, 95% confidence interval: 8.364-18.179, P < 0.001).

Conclusions:

This study suggested smoking to be a potential risk factor for the development of AA/F diseases in a Chinese population. Consequently, current smoking patients should be informed of this relationship, and further research should be conducted to explore and investigate this further.

KEYWORDS:

Anal Abscess; Anal Fistula; Risk Factor; Smoking

PMID:
29692373
PMCID:
PMC5937310
DOI:
10.4103/0366-6999.230738
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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