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Gynecol Oncol. 2018 Jun;149(3):470-475. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.04.560.

Acceptability and feasibility of a Fitbit physical activity monitor for endometrial cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Long Island University Brooklyn, Division of Athletic Training, Health and Exercise Science, Brooklyn, NY, United States. Electronic address: amerigo.rossi@liu.edu.
2
Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women's Health, Bronx, NY, United States.
3
Teachers College Columbia University, Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, New York, NY, United States.
4
Division of Biostatistics, Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States.
5
Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women's Health, Bronx, NY, United States; Albert Einstein Cancer Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Endometrial cancer survivors are the least physically active of all cancer survivor groups and exhibit up to 70% obesity. While studies suggest lifestyle interventions result in improved health outcomes, recruitment and availability of these programs are limited. The purpose was to evaluate the acceptability and validity of the Fitbit Alta™ physical activity monitor (Fitbit) for socioculturally diverse endometrial cancer survivors.

METHODS:

Thirty endometrial cancer survivors were given wrist-worn Fitbits to wear for 30 days. Participants then returned the Fitbits, completed the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ), Technology Acceptance Questionnaire, and answered qualitative prompts. Correlations between daily Fitbit step counts, demographic factors, body mass index (BMI), and GLTEQ Index, were analyzed using Stata 13.0. Concordance Correlation Coefficient using U statistics was used to examine convergent validity.

RESULTS:

Twenty-five participants completed the study. Mean age was 62 ± 9 years. Mean BMI was 32 ± 9 kg·m-2. Self-identified race/ethnicity was 36% Hispanic, 36% non-Hispanic white, 16% non-Hispanic black and 12% Asian. Participants wore the Fitbits a median of 93% of possible days. Median daily Fitbit step count was 5325 (IQR: 3761-8753). Mean Technology Acceptance score was 2.8 ± 0.5 out of 4.0. Younger (<65 years) and employed participants were more likely to achieve at least 6000 daily steps (p < 0.05). There was no correlation (CCC = 0.00, p = 0.99) between step count and GLTEQ Index. Most free responses reflected positive experiences.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Fitbits were well accepted in this sample. Self-reported physical activity was not associated with steps recorded. The physical activity data indicate an insufficiently active population.

KEYWORDS:

Endometrial cancer; Fitbit; Obesity; Physical activity tracker; Wearable technology

PMID:
29692337
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2018.04.560
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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