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CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets. 2018;17(3):233-239. doi: 10.2174/1871527317666180424121947.

Clinical Observation of Electroencephalographic Changes and Risk of Convulsion Occurrence in Children Receiving Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Navy General Hospital, Beijing, China.
2
International Experimental Central Nervous System Injury & Repair (IECNSIR), Department of Surgical Sciences, University Hospital, Uppsala University, 75421 Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was intended to observe electroencephalographic (EEG) changes and convulsion attacks in children receiving neural precursor cell transplantation, and to explore the possibility of electrophysiological changes and risk of convulsion occurrence after cell transplantation.

METHOD:

228 children were included in this study who received neural precursor cell transplantation in our hospital between March 2008 and July 2012. No history of convulsion attacks was elicited before cell transplantation. Data about EEG change and convulsion occurrence before and after cell transplantation were analyzed statistically.

RESULTS:

Of the 228 pediatric patients, EEG improvement, deterioration and no significant change were observed in 60, 45 and 122 patients, respectively. One month after transplantation, four (1.76%) patients experienced new convulsions. Of the 227 patients, 25 showed increased and/or abnormal discharges on EEG. Of these, 19 underwent EEG re-examination six months post-operation. Except the convulsive cases mentioned above, there were no new cases of convulsions in the remaining patients. Of the 27 patients including those with abnormal discharge, increased discharge and convulsion attacks, 17 achieved varying degrees of therapeutic efficacy.

CONCLUSION:

Intraventricular transplantation of neural precursor cells is associated with EEG changes in some children and clinical convulsion attacks in individual patients. However, these abnormal changes do not last long and usually return to normal levels within 1-6 months after surgery, along with disappearance of convulsions. Simultaneous occurrence of EEG changes and convulsions do not appear to affect therapeutic efficacy.

KEYWORDS:

Electroencephalographic change; cell transplantation; children; clinical observation; convulsion occurrence; neural precursor cell.

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