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Vet Res. 2018 Apr 24;49(1):38. doi: 10.1186/s13567-018-0531-0.

Immune response to C. novyi-NT immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Comparative Internal Medicine Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, 900 E. Campus Dr, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA. decluea@missouri.edu.
2
Comparative Oncology Radiobiology and Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, 900 E. Campus Dr, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA.
3
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, 2015 SW 16th Avenue, Gainesville, FL, 32608, USA.
4
Comparative Internal Medicine Laboratory, Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, 900 E. Campus Dr, Columbia, MO, 65203, USA.
5
Biomed Valley Discoveries, 4520 Main St, Kansas City, MO, 64111, USA.

Abstract

Clostridium novyi-NT (CVN-NT) spores germinate in hypoxic regions of tumors and have successfully cured induced neoplasia in mouse models and resulted in objective tumor responses in naturally developing neoplasia in the dog. The objective of this pilot, descriptive, prospective, clinical investigation, was to evaluate and describe the immune response to CNV-NT spores to better understand which immune pathways might play a role in the response to this bacteriolytic immunotherapy. Intratumoral injection of CNV-NT spores result in increased phagocytosis and NK cell-like function after treatment. Intravenous injection of CNV-NT spores resulted in increased LPS-induced TNF-α production, LTA-induced IL-10 production and NK cell-like function post-treatment. Increased NK cell-like function was sustained to 28 (intratumoral) or 56 (intravenous) days post-treatment, and increased phagocytic function was sustained to 28 days post-treatment suggesting that CNV-NT spores induce longer-term immune cell function changes. Future investigations evaluating long-term immune system changes and associations between immune function and tumor remission rates should include evaluation of these pathways.

PMID:
29690928
PMCID:
PMC5937821
DOI:
10.1186/s13567-018-0531-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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