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J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2018 Jun;39(5):395-403. doi: 10.1097/DBP.0000000000000571.

Epidemiology and Impact of Health Care Provider-Diagnosed Anxiety and Depression Among US Children.

Author information

1
Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
2
Office of Epidemiology and Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, Rockville, MD.
3
Division of Health Interview Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD.
4
Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO.
5
Office of the Director, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study documents the prevalence and impact of anxiety and depression in US children based on the parent report of health care provider diagnosis.

METHODS:

National Survey of Children's Health data from 2003, 2007, and 2011-2012 were analyzed to estimate the prevalence of anxiety or depression among children aged 6 to 17 years. Estimates were based on the parent report of being told by a health care provider that their child had the specified condition. Sociodemographic characteristics, co-occurrence of other conditions, health care use, school measures, and parenting aggravation were estimated using 2011-2012 data.

RESULTS:

Based on the parent report, lifetime diagnosis of anxiety or depression among children aged 6 to 17 years increased from 5.4% in 2003 to 8.4% in 2011-2012. Current anxiety or depression increased from 4.7% in 2007 to 5.3% in 2011-2012; current anxiety increased significantly, whereas current depression did not change. Anxiety and depression were associated with increased risk of co-occurring conditions, health care use, school problems, and having parents with high parenting aggravation. Children with anxiety or depression with effective care coordination or a medical home were less likely to have unmet health care needs or parents with high parenting aggravation.

CONCLUSION:

By parent report, more than 1 in 20 US children had current anxiety or depression in 2011-2012. Both were associated with significant comorbidity and impact on children and families. These findings may inform efforts to improve the health and well-being of children with internalizing disorders. Future research is needed to determine why child anxiety diagnoses seem to have increased from 2007 to 2012.

PMID:
29688990
PMCID:
PMC6003874
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1097/DBP.0000000000000571

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