Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Health Perspect. 2018 Apr 23;126(4):047011. doi: 10.1289/EHP1837.

Evaluating the Association between Artificial Light-at-Night Exposure and Breast and Prostate Cancer Risk in Spain (MCC-Spain Study).

Author information

1
ISGlobal (Barcelona Institute for Global Health), Barcelona, Spain
2
CIBER (Consorcio de Investigación Biomédica en Red) Epidemiologia y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain
3
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain
4
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA)–Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Granada, Spain
5
Departamento de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
6
Département de physique, Cégep de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada
7
Environment and Sustainability Institute, University Exeter, Penryn, UK
8
IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain
9
Cancer and Environmental Epidemiology Unit, National Centre for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain
10
Instituto de Investigación Marqués de Valdecilla (IDIVAL), Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain
11
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Health Department of Basque Region, San Sebastian, Spain
12
Research Group on Gene–Environment Interactions and Health, University of León, León, Spain
13
Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Navarra (IdiSNA), Instituto de Salud Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
14
Centro de Investigación en Salud y Medio Ambiente (CYSMA), Universidad de Huelva, Huelva, Spain
15
University Institute of Oncology (IUOPA), University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain
16
Centro de Salud Pública de Dénia, Consellería de Sanidad Universal y Salud Pública, Generalitat Valenciana, Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunidad Valenciana (FISABIO), Valencia, Spain
17
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
18
Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (ibs.GRANADA), Complejo Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain
19
Epidemiology Unit and Girona Cancer Registry, Oncology Coordination Plan, Department of Health, Autonomous Government of Catalonia, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Girona, Spain
20
Red de Investigación en Servicios de Salud en Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC), Madrid, Spain
21
Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute ( IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
22
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, L’Hospitalet del Llobregat, Spain

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Night shift work, exposure to light at night (ALAN) and circadian disruption may increase the risk of hormone-dependent cancers.

OBJECTIVES:

We evaluated the association of exposure to ALAN during sleeping time with breast and prostate cancer in a population based multicase-control study (MCC-Spain), among subjects who had never worked at night. We evaluated chronotype, a characteristic that may relate to adaptation to light at night.

METHODS:

We enrolled 1,219 breast cancer cases, 1,385 female controls, 623 prostate cancer cases, and 879 male controls from 11 Spanish regions in 2008-2013. Indoor ALAN information was obtained through questionnaires. Outdoor ALAN was analyzed using images from the International Space Station (ISS) available for Barcelona and Madrid for 2012-2013, including data of remotely sensed upward light intensity and blue light spectrum information for each geocoded longest residence of each MCC-Spain subject.

RESULTS:

Among Barcelona and Madrid participants with information on both indoor and outdoor ALAN, exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue light spectrum was associated with breast cancer [adjusted odds ratio (OR) for highest vs. lowest tertile, OR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.17] and prostate cancer (OR=2.05; 95% CI: 1.38, 3.03). In contrast, those exposed to the highest versus lowest intensity of outdoor ALAN were more likely to be controls than cases, particularly for prostate cancer. Compared with those who reported sleeping in total darkness, men who slept in "quite illuminated" bedrooms had a higher risk of prostate cancer (OR=2.79; 95% CI: 1.55, 5.04), whereas women had a slightly lower risk of breast cancer (OR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.51).

CONCLUSION:

Both prostate and breast cancer were associated with high estimated exposure to outdoor ALAN in the blue-enriched light spectrum. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1837.

PMID:
29687979
PMCID:
PMC6071739
DOI:
10.1289/EHP1837
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center