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Nat Med. 2018 May;24(5):541-550. doi: 10.1038/s41591-018-0014-x. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Understanding the tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) for effective therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
UCSF Immunoprofiler Initiative, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA.
4
Precision Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
5
Department of Cell, Developmental & Cancer Biology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
6
The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD, USA.
8
Huntsman Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
9
Division of Inflammation Biology, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA.
10
Department of Medicine, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
11
Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
12
Edwin L. Steele Laboratories for Tumor Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
13
Department of Surgery, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
14
Division of Cancer Biology, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
15
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA. weinberg@wi.mit.edu.
16
Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. matthew.krummel@ucsf.edu.
17
UCSF Immunoprofiler Initiative, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. matthew.krummel@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

The clinical successes in immunotherapy have been both astounding and at the same time unsatisfactory. Countless patients with varied tumor types have seen pronounced clinical response with immunotherapeutic intervention; however, many more patients have experienced minimal or no clinical benefit when provided the same treatment. As technology has advanced, so has the understanding of the complexity and diversity of the immune context of the tumor microenvironment and its influence on response to therapy. It has been possible to identify different subclasses of immune environment that have an influence on tumor initiation and response and therapy; by parsing the unique classes and subclasses of tumor immune microenvironment (TIME) that exist within a patient's tumor, the ability to predict and guide immunotherapeutic responsiveness will improve, and new therapeutic targets will be revealed.

PMID:
29686425
PMCID:
PMC5998822
DOI:
10.1038/s41591-018-0014-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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