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Pediatrics. 2018 May;141(5). pii: e20173361. doi: 10.1542/peds.2017-3361.

E-Cigarette and Liquid Nicotine Exposures Among Young Children.

Author information

1
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
2
Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey.
3
Central Ohio Poison Center, Columbus, Ohio.
4
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; and.
5
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; gary.smith@nationwidechildrens.org.
6
Child Injury Prevention Alliance, Columbus, Ohio.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate exposures to liquid nicotine (including electronic cigarette devices and liquids) among children <6 years old in the United States and evaluate the impact of legislation requiring child-resistant packaging for liquid nicotine containers.

METHODS:

Liquid nicotine exposure data from the National Poison Data System for January 2012 through April 2017 were analyzed.

RESULTS:

There were 8269 liquid nicotine exposures among children <6 years old reported to US poison control centers during the study period. Most (92.5%) children were exposed through ingestion and 83.9% were children <3 years old. Among children exposed to liquid nicotine, 35.1% were treated and released from a health care facility, and 1.4% were admitted. The annual exposure rate per 100 000 children increased by 1398.2% from 0.7 in 2012 to 10.4 in 2015, and subsequently decreased by 19.8% from 2015 to 8.3 in 2016. Among states without a preexisting law requiring child-resistant packaging for liquid nicotine containers, there was a significant decrease in the mean number of exposures during the 9 months before compared with the 9 months after the federal child-resistant packaging law went into effect, averaging 4.4 (95% confidence interval: -7.1 to -1.7) fewer exposures per state after implementation of the law.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pediatric exposures to liquid nicotine have decreased since January 2015, which may, in part, be attributable to legislation requiring child-resistant packaging and greater public awareness of risks associated with electronic cigarette products. Liquid nicotine continues to pose a serious risk for young children. Additional regulation of these products is warranted.

PMID:
29686144
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2017-3361

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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