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J Infect Dis. 2018 Aug 14;218(6):848-855. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy232.

Heterotypic Infection and Spread of Rhinovirus A, B, and C among Childcare Attendees.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Michigan Medicine at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
5
Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland.
6
Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland.
7
Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle.
9
Seattle Children's Research Institute, Washington.

Abstract

Background:

Despite the frequency of human rhinovirus (HRV), data describing the molecular epidemiology of HRV in the community are limited. Childcare centers are optimal settings to characterize heterotypic HRV cocirculation.

Methods:

HRV specimens were prospectively obtained from a cohort of childcare attendees at enrollment and weekly during respiratory illness. The 5' noncoding region sequences were used to determine HRV species (A, B, C) and genotypes.

Results:

Among 225 children followed, sequence data were available for 92 HRV infections: HRV-A (n = 80; 59%) was most common, followed by HRV-C (n = 52, 39%), and HRV-B (n = 3, 2%). Forty-one genotypes were identified and cocirculation was common. Frequent spread between classrooms occurred with 2 HRV-A genotypes. Repeated detections within single illnesses were a combination of persistent (n = 7) and distinct (n = 7) genotypes. Prevalence of HRV among asymptomatic children was 41%. HRV-C was clinically similar to HRV-A and HRV-B.

Conclusions:

HRV epidemiology in childcare consists of heterotypic cocirculation of genotypes with periodic spread within and among classrooms. Based on our finding of multiple genotypes evident during the course of single illnesses, the use of sequence-based HRV type determination is critical in longitudinal studies of HRV epidemiology and transmission.

PMID:
29684211
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiy232
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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