Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Public Underst Sci. 2019 Jan;28(1):38-52. doi: 10.1177/0963662518772508. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Wind, power, and the situatedness of community engagement.

Author information

1
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Republic of Korea.
2
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Republic of Korea.
3
Pusan National University, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Jeju, an island in Korea, became a place to site wind turbines with an unusually high level of public acceptance. Based on interviews, media analyses, and policy research, we found that the collective memory of socio-economic deprivation enabled community engagement to matter to residents, the provincial government, and environmental activists. It was within socio-historically contextualized processes of articulating the vision of a "good" society that an actual form of community engagement, however inadequate it might appear to some, became relevant to stakeholders in a particular locality. We emphasize that community engagement in renewable energy governance does not have one but multiple and situated ways of mattering depending on local contexts.

KEYWORDS:

energy policy; public participation; risk governance

PMID:
29683059
DOI:
10.1177/0963662518772508

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center